Mālama Kamananui

Education

About

Mālama - to care, protect, nurture

For over five decades, MGF has pioneered environmental education programs that help students understand and appreciate the history and cultural significance of Kamananui Valley. Utilizing experiential and place-based learning, our goal is to inspire the next generation of environmental stewards.

We offer a variety of education programming (K-12), both on campus and utilizing Kamananui Valley as our outdoor classroom. Student drop off for all environmental programs will be at Moanalua Valley Neighborhood Park. To learn more or book a reservation with us for your class please contact us at: MalamaKamananui@gmail.com

Environmental Education Programs

Field Experiences

  • Field Experiences are single day, 2-3 hour opportunities for students to come out to Kamananui Valley as a class to get hands-on experience in the last undeveloped region of Moanalua. We offer a variety of programming, including experiences in environmental science, plant identification, cultural history, and mālama ʻāina.
  • All programs are available for free for Oʻahu students and scheduled on a first-come-first-served basis. If we are unable to accommodate your first choice of program or scheduling for any reason, we are happy to coordinate with you.
  • FREE to Students Grades K-12

Alakaʻi Program

  • The Moanalua Gardens Foundation is pleased to offer a new environmental education program to our partnering schools this semester. This 9-week program will blend classroom lessons with experiential learning opportunities in the valley. Students will engage with different themes and activities in Kamananui Valley that will prepare them to be the next generation of environmental stewards.
  • FREE to Students Grades 9-12

Ahupuaʻa

This was the basic land structure in ancient times. When people asked you where you came from it was your Ahupuaʻa you declared. The varied climatic conditions gave them wet environments on windward sides, and dry on leeward sides. Most were shaped by the mountain valleys that spilled onto the plains until reaching the seashore. Moanalua is unique as it contains two valleys, a large plain and a very large seashore reef. Hawaiians were able to survive completely sustained by their ahupuaʻa so that some inhabitants lived their entire lives without ever leaving the boundaries.

Moku - Kona

The Hawaiian structure for island regions is based on the Ahupuaʻa. All islands, Mokupuni, follow this basic principle, with a collection of ʻIli and Lele. Oʻahu was organized into six Moku districts. Kona – which is southern, and Moanalua is the northern most ahupuaʻa. ‘Ewa, Wai’anae, Waialua, Koʻolauloa, and Ko’olaupoko made the six Moku.

Ahupuaʻa were generally wedge shaped and usually began at the crest of the mountain running down to the sea but sometimes reaching over the mountain into another region. (Wai’anae) Each Ahupuaʻa provided farming, fishing, gathering and water access. During the annual Makahiki Pilgrimage, this clockwise island-circuit, kaʻapuni, of the Mokupuni, was one of the routes.

Ahupuaʻa comes from the ʻAltar of the Pigʻ. At the border between these land sections an altar was created adorned with the head of a pig, sometimes a carved image from Kukui tree trunk to symbolize Akua Lono and his farming icon Kamapua’a.

Ahupuaʻa - Moanalua

Our Ahupuaʻa sits at the center edge of Oʻahu island and the beginning of the southern district of Kona. It is a large section including two valleys Uka flowing to the wide Kula plain rimmed by the reef of Keʻehi. Moanalua refers to these two wide expanses of ʻĀina(land) and Kai(seashore), a poetic reference to an ocean of fresh water and sea water. Historically Moanalua was an important food resource. filled with taro patches, fishponds, koa iʻa, ulu and maiʻa groves all supported by a fresh water delta. Most of these near shore areas have been filled in, what is now known as Māpunapuna industrial district and the Daniel K Inouye Honolulu International Airport. Māpunapuna literally means bubbling spring.

Awāwa - Kamananui-Kamanaiki

These twin valleys are the nurturing arms of our watershed. They have been sheltered from development and where we focus most of our education and stewardship activities. Protecting, preserving and perpetuating a vibrant environment ensures our ability to thrive.

  • Kamananui – the large empowering spirit
  • Kamanaiki – the small empowering spirit

Moku - Kona

The Hawaiian structure for island regions is based on the Ahupuaʻa. All islands, Mokupuni, follow this basic principle, with a collection of ʻIli and Lele. Oʻahu was organized into six Moku districts. Kona – which is southern, and Moanalua is the northern most ahupuaʻa. ‘Ewa, Wai’anae, Waialua, Koʻolauloa, and Ko’olaupoko made the six Moku.

Ahupuaʻa were generally wedge shaped and usually began at the crest of the mountain running down to the sea but sometimes reaching over the mountain into another region. (Wai’anae) Each Ahupuaʻa provided farming, fishing, gathering and water access. During the annual Makahiki Pilgrimage, this clockwise island-circuit, kaʻapuni, of the Mokupuni, was one of the routes.

Ahupuaʻa comes from the ʻAltar of the Pigʻ. At the border between these land sections an altar was created adorned with the head of a pig, sometimes a carved image from Kukui tree trunk to symbolize Akua Lono and his farming icon Kamapua’a.

Ahupuaʻa - Moanalua

Our Ahupuaʻa sits at the center edge of Oʻahu island and the beginning of the southern district of Kona. It is a large section including two valleys Uka flowing to the wide Kula plain rimmed by the reef of Keʻehi. Moanalua refers to these two wide expanses of ʻĀina(land) and Kai(seashore), a poetic reference to an ocean of fresh water and sea water. Historically Moanalua was an important food resource. filled with taro patches, fishponds, koa iʻa, ulu and maiʻa groves all supported by a fresh water delta. Most of these near shore areas have been filled in, what is now known as Māpunapuna industrial district and the Daniel K Inouye Honolulu International Airport. Māpunapuna literally means bubbling spring.

Awāwa - Kamananui-Kamanaiki

These twin valleys are the nurturing arms of our watershed. They have been sheltered from development and where we focus most of our education and stewardship activities. Protecting, preserving and perpetuating a vibrant environment ensures our ability to thrive.

  • Kamananui – the large empowering spirit
  • Kamanaiki – the small empowering spirit

Learn More
about Ahupuaʻa

Moanalua Ahupua‘a

How did people in old Hawaiʻi live in our ahupuaʻa?

Funders

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Partners

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Group 1279
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Group 1280

Ma Ka Hana Ka ‘Ike

One learns through doing

Make A Donation

A non-profit organization, MGF needs your help to continue to educate our youth and inspire a new generation of environmental stewards.

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